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Administrative

Numerous federal, regional, and state political and management boundaries of the Mid-Atlantic are compiled here to provide a regulatory context to help facilitate well-informed ocean planning decisions.

Tribal Headquarters

These are point locations of tribal headquarters within the MARCO region. These points do not represent boundaries or sphere of influence. This dataset was created through internet searches and phone calls to confirm addresses of tribal headquarters.

Source: The Whitener Group and MARCO portal team

Notes:

In some cases tribal addresses are post office boxes, in which case the point location is more generalized.

OCS Lease Blocks

OCS blocks are used to define small geographic areas within an Official Protraction Diagram (OPD) for leasing and administrative purposes.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Notes:

Atlantic Canyon Withdrawal

This data layer represents Atlantic Canyon Withdrawal area and was produced by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). Areas currently under congressional moratoria or executive (presidential) withdraw from leasing for oil, gas, or minerals within the US Outer Continental Shelf. The president of the U.S. has withdrawn all Sanctuaries and Monuments from future leasing, so these areas are included in this layer. Links to announcements, E.O.'s or CFR references are available within the layer for each area.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM)

Notes:

This layer should not be used for official location purposes. All polygons have been reprojected from their original projection and datum in order to create a national level layer. Locations are not precise and should be taken from the appropriate legal authority from which it was created.

Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument

On September 15, 2016, President Obama designated the first marine national monument in the Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, using his authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906. The monument includes two distinct areas. The Canyon Unit covers Oceanographer, Gilbert, and Lydonia Canyons. The Seamount Unit covers Bear, Physalia, Retriever, and Mytilus Seamounts. These are located about 130 miles east-southeast of Cape Cod, and cover a total area of more than 4,900 square miles, about the size of Connecticut, or slightly larger than Yellowstone National Park. From the Presidential Proclamation: "The Secretaries of Commerce and the Interior (Secretaries) shall share management responsibility for the monument. The Secretary of Commerce, through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior, shall have responsibility for management of activities and species within the monument under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, the Endangered Species Act (for species regulated by NOAA), the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and any other applicable Department of Commerce legal authorities. The Secretary of the Interior, through the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, shall have responsibility for management of activities and species within the monument under its applicable legal authorities, including the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act, the Refuge Recreation Act, and the Endangered Species Act (for species regulated by FWS), and Public Law 98-532 and Executive Order 6166 of June 10, 1933."

Source: NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) - Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office (GARFO)

Notes:

This dataset was created to depict the boundaries of this marine national monument only. For information on the proper use of the dataset refer to the Use Constraints metadata section. This shapefile includes boundaries for the following Regulated Areas: - Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Canyon Unit - Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Seamount Unit Because GIS projection and topology functions can change or generalize coordinates, these GIS files are considered to be approximate representations and are NOT an OFFICIAL record for the exact regulated area boundaries. For information on the official legal definition refer to the Use Constraints metadata section.

Federal OCS Administrative Boundaries

Administrative boundaries extending from the Submerged Lands Act boundary seaward to the US Outer Continental Shelf. These boundaries were created for BOEM administrative purposes only, such as delineating BOEM planning areas or determining shared state revenue sharing within the 3 nautical mile zone seaward of the SLA boundary known as the Revenue Sharing Boundary. They were created using the equidistant principle used to divide offshore areas between countries as defined within the UNCLOS. They are not meant to depict areas offshore as pertaining to or controlled by any particular state.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Notes:

Marine Jurisdictions

Federally - and internationally - recognized political, legal, and resource management boundaries.

Submerged Lands Act Boundary – also known as the state seaward boundary, this line serves to distinguish state and federal jurisdictions (3 nautical miles seaward from mean low low water [MLLW]).

8g Revenue Sharing Line (Limit of OCSLA '8(g)' zone) – area where revenues from energy resources are shared by federal and coastal state governments (extends seaward 3 nautical miles from Submerged Lands Act Boundary).

Territorial Sea Boundary (12NM Territorial Sea) – region of U.S. sovereignty (extends from MLLW to 12 nautical miles from shore).

Contiguous Zone Boundary (24NM Territorial Sea) – area of limited control in preventing or punishing infringement of customs or laws (extends from MLLW to 24 nautical miles from shore; alternately extends seaward 12 nautical miles from Territorial Sea Boundary).

Exclusive Economic Zone (200NM EEZ and Maritime Boundaries) – area of sole rights for resource use, research, and protection (extends from Territorial Sea Boundary to 200 nautical miles from shore).

Source:

Notes:

12NM Territorial Sea / Marine Jurisdictions

Each coastal State may claim a territorial sea that extends seaward up to 12 nautical miles from its baselines. The coastal State exercises sovereignty over its territorial sea, the air space above it, and the seabed and subsoil beneath it.

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Notes:

These limits and boundaries do not represent the official depiction. For official depiction, please see NOAA's paper or raster nautical charts.

24NM Territorial Sea / Marine Jurisdictions

Each coastal State may claim a contiguous zone adjacent to and beyond its territorial sea that extends seaward up to 24 nautical miles from its baselines. In its contiguous zone, a coastal State may exercise the control necessary to prevent the infringement of its customs, fiscal, immigration or sanitary laws and regulations within its territory or territorial sea, and punish infringement of those laws and regulations committed within its territory or territorial sea.

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Notes:

These limits and boundaries do not represent the official depiction. For official depiction, please see NOAA's paper or raster nautical charts.

200NM EEZ and Maritime Boundaries / Marine Jurisdictions

Each coastal State may claim an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) beyond and adjacent to its territorial sea that extends seaward up to 200 nautical miles from its baselines (or out to a maritime boundary with another coastal State).

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Notes:

These limits and boundaries do not represent the official depiction. For official depiction, please see NOAA's paper or raster nautical charts.

Limit of OCSLA '8(g)' zone / Marine Jurisdictions

The revenue sharing boundary was established under Section 8(g) of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. It provides for eligible states to claim a percentage of the share of oil, gas, or wind energy revenues when a federal lease is within three miles of the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

Notes:

Submerged Lands Act Boundary / Marine Jurisdictions

The Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary or Fed State Boundary) defines the seaward limit of a state's submerged lands and the landward boundary of federally managed OCS lands. In the BOEM Atlantic Region it is projected 3 nautical miles offshore from the baseline.

Source: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

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