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Security

The Mid-Atlantic is home to important naval installations and training areas, and it’s a busy corridor for commercial shipping and naval and other defense and security operations.

Danger Zones & Restricted Areas

These data represent the location of Danger Zones and Restricted Areas within coastal and marine waters, as outlined by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and the Raster Navigational Charts (RNC). The CFR defines a Danger Zone as, "A defined water area (or areas) used for target practice, bombing, rocket firing or other especially hazardous operations, normally for the armed forces. The danger zones may be closed to the public on a full-time or intermittent basis, as stated in the regulations." The CFR defines a Restricted Area as, "A defined water area for the purpose of prohibiting or limiting public access to the area. Restricted areas generally provide security for Government property and/or protection to the public from the risks of damage or injury arising from the Government's use of that area." Caution should be used if navigating near these areas. Authoritative information relating to these data may be found in Title 33, Chapter II of the CFR (Part 334).

Source: Department of Defense via the Code of Federal Regulations; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

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Unexploded Ordnances

Unexploded ordnances (or UXOs/UXBs, sometimes identified as UO) are explosive weapons (bombs, bullets, shells, grenades, land mines, naval mines, etc.) that did not explode when they were employed and still pose a risk of detonation, potentially many decades after they were used or discarded. While “UXO” is widely and informally used, munitions and explosives of concern (MEC) is the current preferred terminology within the remediation community. This is NOT a complete collection of unexploded ordnances on the seafloor, nor are the locations to be considered exact.

Source: NOAA Office of Coast Survey; Mapped by MarineCadastre.gov

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Military Installation Location

Multiple military installations are located on land adjacent to the offshore Range Complexes. These installations may use the waters and air space of the range complexes for training or testing activities as well as other nearby range complexes. Fifteen military installations are located on land adjacent to the offshore Mid-Atlantic Complexes:
  • Ralph O. Odom, ME
  • Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, ME
  • Newport Naval Station, RI
  • Naval Submarine Base New London, CT
  • Naval Weapons Station Earle, NJ
  • Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ
  • Naval Air Station Patuxent River, MD
  • Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, MD
  • Naval Station Norfolk, VA
  • Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek, VA
  • Joint Expeditionary Base Fort Story, VA
  • Naval Air Station Oceana, VA
  • Feet Combat Training Centre Dam Neck, VA
  • Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC
  • Marie Corps Base Camp LeJeune, NC
These installations may use the waters and air space of the Virginia Capes (VACAPES) Range Complex for training or testing activities as well as other nearby range complexes located in the Northeast. The offshore VACAPES Range Complexes are also used for training and testing activities by visiting installations.

Source: Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Atlantic

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Military Operating Area Boundaries

An Operating Area (OPAREA) Complex boundary is the bounded area in which national defense training exercises and system qualification tests are routinely conducted. OPAREA boundaries are formally established by national designation and by international treaty for national defense training purposes, and allow for specific exercises and training events to be coordinated with other federal, state, and local agencies, and also the general public, as in Notices to Mariners (NOTMARS). Includes the OPAREA, range complex boundaries and study areas. The MarineCadastre.gov team worked with the Navy to provide this data, which is a subset of the Navy's Common Operating Picture, for ocean planning purposes.

Source: Department of Defense; Services from MarineCadastre.gov

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Military Regulated Airspace

Military regulated airspace areas depict the Air Traffic Control Assigned Airspace (ATCAA) and Airspace Corridor areas. The MarineCadastre.gov team worked with the Navy to provide this data, which is a subset of the Navy's Common Operating Picture, for ocean planning purposes.

Source: Department of Defense; Services from MarineCadastre.gov

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Military Special Use Airspace

Military Special Use Airspace is airspace of defined dimensions identified by an area on the surface of the earth wherein activities must be confined because of their nature, and/or wherein limitations may be imposed upon aircraft operations that are not a part of those activities (FAA Order 7610.4K CHG 1, Section 1.3). Limitations may be imposed upon aircraft operations that are not a part of the airspace activities. Special use airspace includes any associated underlying surface and subsurface training areas. The types of SUA are Special Use Airspace (SUA), Alert Area, Controlled Firing Area, Military Operating Area (MOA), Special Operation Area (SOA), Prohibited Area, Restricted Area, Warning Area and Altitude Reservations (ALTRV). DoD Special Use Airspace (SUA) from the NGA Digital Aeronautical Flight Information File (DAFIF). The source datasets are updated on a regular basis. The MarineCadastre.gov team worked with the Navy to provide this data, which is a subset of the Navy's Common Operating Picture, for ocean planning purposes.

Source: Department of Defense; Services from MarineCadastre.gov

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Military ​Surface Grid Areas

A regular pattern of polygons that represent arbitrary delineations of an Operating Area (OPAREA). The MarineCadastre.gov team worked with the Navy to provide this data, which is a subset of the Navy's Common Operating Picture, for ocean planning purposes.

Source: Department of Defense; Services from MarineCadastre.gov

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