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Marine Life

The Mid-Atlantic region is well known for nutrient-rich and highly productive waters. Its estuaries, salt marshes, sea grasses, barrier islands, cold water corals, and submarine canyons provide spawning, nursery, and forage habitats that support diverse resident and migratory marine life including invertebrates, seabirds, fishes, and marine mammals.

Birds

Marine life data products were developed through a partnership with the Marine-life Data and Analysis Team (MDAT), who collaborated with the Northeast Regional Planning Body (RPB) and expert work groups to produce maps characterizing the predicted distribution and abundance for 29 marine mammal species and species guilds, 40 bird species, and the surveyed biomass of 82 fish species.

Based on RPB, work group, and public feedback, we further aggregated these base products into maps for various species groups within each marine life category to provide additional information to support different management and conservation activities. To facilitate targeted data exploration and decision making, we developed synthetic maps characterizing the abundance, richness, diversity, and core relative abundance area richness (50%) for these groups of species and for complete taxa. These synthetic map products are meant to supplement the individual species outputs.

All map products were informed by public input, work groups composed of over 80 regional scientists and managers, the Ecosystem Based Management Work Group, and similar proceedings in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Source: Marine Life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The synthetic map products provide a means to distill multiple data layers and time periods into simplified maps. Development of these maps required decisions and thresholds that are explained in the information accompanying each layer. These decisions were made after conducting research, development, and testing of several options, as well as incorporating feedback from expert work group members and the RPB. Understanding these decisions and thresholds is crucial to proper interpretation of these map products.

Species group definitions were developed by MDAT with guidance and input from the marine life expert work groups and RPB. There are three main caveats when considering use of the species groups: (1) The species within these groups represent only those modeled or mapped by MDAT. As an example, there may be additional “migrant” bird species not captured in this species group because there were insufficient observations available to develop an individual species model. (2) The groups are not exhaustive. There is potential for additional groups, but the data and information available at this time do not support their formation. In order to develop species membership lists for all groups, we relied on expert judgment and published sources of information. (3) Group level products (relative abundance, richness, and core relative abundance area richness) were created with the normalized annual prediction models, and so should be interpreted accordingly.

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All Avian Species: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 40 bird species were modeled: Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

All Avian Species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 40 bird species were modeled: Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

All Avian Species: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 40 bird species were modeled: Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Nearshore Species: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Nearshore species include Arctic tern, Black scoter, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common tern, Double-crested cormorant, Horned grebe, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Nearshore Species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Nearshore species include Arctic tern, Black scoter, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common tern, Double-crested cormorant, Horned grebe, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Nearshore Species: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Nearshore species include Arctic tern, Black scoter, Brown pelican, Common eider, Common loon, Common tern, Double-crested cormorant, Horned grebe, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Offshore/Pelagic Species: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Offshore/pelagic species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Leach's storm-petrel, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Offshore/Pelagic Species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Offshore/pelagic species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Leach's storm-petrel, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Offshore/Pelagic Species: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Offshore/pelagic species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Leach's storm-petrel, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Coastal waterfowl: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Coastal waterfowl species include Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Long-tailed duck, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Coastal waterfowl: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Coastal waterfowl species include Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Long-tailed duck, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Coastal waterfowl: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Coastal waterfowl species include Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Long-tailed duck, Red-throated loon, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Divers and pursuit plungers: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Divers and pursuit plungers species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Common loon, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Manx shearwater, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, and Sooty shearwater

View related studies via ESPIS

Divers and pursuit plungers: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Divers and pursuit plungers species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Common loon, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Manx shearwater, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, and Sooty shearwater

View related studies via ESPIS

Divers and pursuit plungers: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Divers and pursuit plungers species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Common loon, Common murre, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Manx shearwater, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, and Sooty shearwater

View related studies via ESPIS

Benthic/bivalve eaters: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Benthic/bivalve eaters include Black scoter, Common eider, Long-tailed duck, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Benthic/bivalve eaters: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Benthic/bivalve eaters include Black scoter, Common eider, Long-tailed duck, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Benthic/bivalve eaters: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Benthic/bivalve eaters include Black scoter, Common eider, Long-tailed duck, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface feeders: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface feeder species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Great black-backed gull, Herring gull, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Northern fulmar, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Ring-billed gull, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface feeders: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface feeder species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Great black-backed gull, Herring gull, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Northern fulmar, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Ring-billed gull, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface feeders: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface feeder species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Great black-backed gull, Herring gull, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Northern fulmar, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Ring-billed gull, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface plungers: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface plunger species include Arctic tern, Brown pelican, Common tern, Least tern, Northern gannet, Roseate tern, and Royal tern

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface plungers: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface plunger species include Arctic tern, Brown pelican, Common tern, Least tern, Northern gannet, Roseate tern, and Royal tern

View related studies via ESPIS

Surface plungers: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Surface plunger species include Arctic tern, Brown pelican, Common tern, Least tern, Northern gannet, Roseate tern, and Royal tern

View related studies via ESPIS

Fish eaters: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Fish eater species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Least tern, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Fish eaters: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Fish eater species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Least tern, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Fish eaters: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Fish eater species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Brown pelican, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm-petrel, Least tern, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Sooty shearwater, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Squid eaters: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Squid eater species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, and Leach's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Squid eaters: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Squid eater species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, and Leach's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Squid eaters: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Squid eater species include Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black-capped petrel, and Leach's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Crustacean eaters: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Crustacean eater species include Atlantic puffin, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Bonaparte's gull, Common murre, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Leach's storm-petrel, Long-tailed duck, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Crustacean eaters: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Crustacean eater species include Atlantic puffin, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Bonaparte's gull, Common murre, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Leach's storm-petrel, Long-tailed duck, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Crustacean eaters: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Crustacean eater species include Atlantic puffin, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Bonaparte's gull, Common murre, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Leach's storm-petrel, Long-tailed duck, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Migrant species: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Migrant species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

View related studies via ESPIS

Migrant species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Migrant species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

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Migrant species: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Migrant species include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Band-rumped storm-petrel, Black scoter, Black-capped petrel, Black-legged kittiwake, Bonaparte's gull, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Dovekie, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Ring-billed gull, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm-petrel

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State listed species: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

State-listed species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Razorbill, and Roseate tern

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State listed species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

State-listed species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Razorbill, and Roseate tern

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State listed species: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

State-listed species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Leach's storm petrel, Least tern, Razorbill, and Roseate tern

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BCR30 Priority species: Abundance / Birds

BCR 30 refers to the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture's New England/Mid-Atlantic Coast Bird Conservation Region. For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The BCR 30 priority species included here are Audubon's shearwater, Black scoter, Common eider, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Least tern, Lesser scaup, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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BCR30 Priority species: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

BCR 30 refers to the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture's New England/Mid-Atlantic Coast Bird Conservation Region. The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The BCR 30 priority species included here are Audubon's shearwater, Black scoter, Common eider, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Least tern, Lesser scaup, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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BCR30 Priority species: Species Richness / Birds

BCR 30 refers to the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture's New England/Mid-Atlantic Coast Bird Conservation Region. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

BCR 30 refers to the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture's New England/Mid-Atlantic Coast Bird Conservation Region. The BCR 30 priority species included here are Audubon's shearwater, Black scoter, Common eider, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Horned grebe, Least tern, Lesser scaup, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Royal tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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AMBCC high conservation concern: Abundance / Birds

These are species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, and White-winged scoter

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AMBCC high conservation concern: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

These are species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, and White-winged scoter

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AMBCC high conservation concern: Species Richness / Birds

These are species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of high conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black-capped petrel, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Least tern, Long-tailed duck, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, and White-winged scoter

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AMBCC medium conservation concern: Abundance / Birds

These are species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Arctic tern, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Brown pelican, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Leach's storm petrel, Manx shearwater, Red phalarope, and Royal tern

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AMBCC medium conservation concern: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

These are species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Arctic tern, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Brown pelican, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Leach's storm petrel, Manx shearwater, Red phalarope, and Royal tern

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AMBCC medium conservation concern: Species Richness / Birds

These are species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of medium conservation concern for the Northwestern Atlantic Marine Bird Conservation Cooperative include Arctic tern, Band-rumped storm petrel, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Brown pelican, Cory's shearwater, Great shearwater, Leach's storm petrel, Manx shearwater, Red phalarope, and Royal tern

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Higher collision sensitivity: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher collision sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

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Higher collision sensitivity: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher collision sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

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Higher collision sensitivity: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher collision sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Audubon's shearwater, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Black-legged kittiwake, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Cory's shearwater, Double-crested cormorant, Great black-backed gull, Great shearwater, Herring gull, Horned grebe, Laughing gull, Leach's storm petrel, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern fulmar, Northern gannet, Pomarine jaeger, Razorbill, Red phalarope, Red-necked phalarope, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Sooty shearwater, Surf scoter, White-winged scoter, and Wilson's storm petrel

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Higher displacement sensitivity: Abundance / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting "column". The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher displacement sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Great black-backed gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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Higher displacement sensitivity: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Birds

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher displacement sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Great black-backed gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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Higher displacement sensitivity: Species Richness / Birds

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species' predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Higher displacement sensitivity species include Arctic tern, Atlantic puffin, Black guillemot, Black scoter, Common eider, Common loon, Common murre, Common tern, Great black-backed gull, Long-tailed duck, Manx shearwater, Northern gannet, Razorbill, Red-throated loon, Roseate tern, Surf scoter, and White-winged scoter

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Fish

Marine life data products were developed through a partnership with the Marine-life Data and Analysis Team (MDAT), who collaborated with the Northeast Regional Planning Body (RPB) and expert work groups to produce maps characterizing the predicted distribution and abundance for 29 marine mammal species and species guilds, 40 bird species, and the surveyed biomass of 82 fish species.

Based on RPB, work group, and public feedback, we further aggregated these base products into maps for various species groups within each marine life category to provide additional information to support different management and conservation activities. To facilitate targeted data exploration and decision making, we developed synthetic maps characterizing the abundance, richness, diversity, and core relative abundance area richness (50%) for these groups of species and for complete taxa. These synthetic map products are meant to supplement the individual species outputs.

All map products were informed by public input, work groups composed of over 80 regional scientists and managers, the Ecosystem Based Management Work Group, and similar proceedings in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Source: Marine Life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The synthetic map products provide a means to distill multiple data layers and time periods into simplified maps. Development of these maps required decisions and thresholds that are explained in the information accompanying each layer. These decisions were made after conducting research, development, and testing of several options, as well as incorporating feedback from expert work group members and the RPB. Understanding these decisions and thresholds is crucial to proper interpretation of these map products.

Species group definitions were developed by MDAT with guidance and input from the marine life expert work groups and RPB. There are three main caveats when considering use of the species groups: (1) The species within these groups represent only those modeled or mapped by MDAT. As an example, there may be additional “migrant” bird species not captured in this species group because there were insufficient observations available to develop an individual species model. (2) The groups are not exhaustive. There is potential for additional groups, but the data and information available at this time do not support their formation. In order to develop species membership lists for all groups, we relied on expert judgment and published sources of information. (3) Group level products (relative abundance, richness, and core relative abundance area richness) were created with the normalized annual prediction models, and so should be interpreted accordingly.

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All Fish Species: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 82 fish species were modeled: Acadian redfish, Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American plaice, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic cod, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic torpedo, Atlantic wolfish, Banded drum, Barndoor skate, Bay anchovy, Black sea bass, Blackbelly rosefish, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Bluntnose stingray, Bullnose ray, Butterfish, Capelin, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Cusk, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Gulfstream flounder, Haddock, Hickory shad, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Little skate, Longfin squid, Longhorn sculpin, Northern kingfish, Northern pipefish, Northern puffer, Northern sand lance, Northern searobin, Northern shortfin squid, Northern shrimp, Ocean pout, Pigfish, Pinfish, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Roughtail stingray, Round herring, Sand tiger, Scup, Sea raven, Sea scallop, Silver hake, Smooth dogfish, Smooth skate, Southern stingray, Spiny butterfly ray, Spiny dogfish, Spotted hake, Spot, Striped anchovy, Striped bass, Striped sea robin, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, Tilefish, Weakfish, White hake, Windowpane, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, and Yellowtail flounder

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All Fish Species: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 82 fish species were modeled: Acadian redfish, Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American plaice, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic cod, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic torpedo, Atlantic wolfish, Banded drum, Barndoor skate, Bay anchovy, Black sea bass, Blackbelly rosefish, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Bluntnose stingray, Bullnose ray, Butterfish, Capelin, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Cusk, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Gulfstream flounder, Haddock, Hickory shad, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Little skate, Longfin squid, Longhorn sculpin, Northern kingfish, Northern pipefish, Northern puffer, Northern sand lance, Northern searobin, Northern shortfin squid, Northern shrimp, Ocean pout, Pigfish, Pinfish, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Roughtail stingray, Round herring, Sand tiger, Scup, Sea raven, Sea scallop, Silver hake, Smooth dogfish, Smooth skate, Southern stingray, Spiny butterfly ray, Spiny dogfish, Spotted hake, Spot, Striped anchovy, Striped bass, Striped sea robin, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, Tilefish, Weakfish, White hake, Windowpane, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, and Yellowtail flounder

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All Fish Species: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 82 fish species were modeled: Acadian redfish, Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American plaice, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic cod, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic torpedo, Atlantic wolfish, Banded drum, Barndoor skate, Bay anchovy, Black sea bass, Blackbelly rosefish, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Bluntnose stingray, Bullnose ray, Butterfish, Capelin, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Cusk, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Gulfstream flounder, Haddock, Hickory shad, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Little skate, Longfin squid, Longhorn sculpin, Northern kingfish, Northern pipefish, Northern puffer, Northern sand lance, Northern searobin, Northern shortfin squid, Northern shrimp, Ocean pout, Pigfish, Pinfish, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Roughtail stingray, Round herring, Sand tiger, Scup, Sea raven, Sea scallop, Silver hake, Smooth dogfish, Smooth skate, Southern stingray, Spiny butterfly ray, Spiny dogfish, Spotted hake, Spot, Striped anchovy, Striped bass, Striped sea robin, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, Tilefish, Weakfish, White hake, Windowpane, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, and Yellowtail flounder

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Demersal Fish: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Demersal species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Haddock, Little skate, Longhorn sculpin, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea raven, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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Demersal Fish: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Demersal species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Haddock, Little skate, Longhorn sculpin, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea raven, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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Demersal Fish: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Demersal species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Clearnose skate, Cunner, Fourspot flounder, Goosefish, Haddock, Little skate, Longhorn sculpin, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea raven, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Summer flounder, Tautog, Thorny skate, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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Diadromous Fish: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Diadromous species include Alewife, American eel, American shad, Atlantic sturgeon, Blueback herring, Hickory shad, and Shortnose sturgeon

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Diadromous Fish: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Diadromous species include Alewife, American eel, American shad, Atlantic sturgeon, Blueback herring, Hickory shad, and Shortnose sturgeon

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Diadromous Fish: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Diadromous species include Alewife, American eel, American shad, Atlantic sturgeon, Blueback herring, Hickory shad, and Shortnose sturgeon

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Forage Fish: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Forage species include Alewife, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Bay anchovy, Blueback herring, Butterfish, Capelin, Hickory shad, Northern sand lance, Round herring, and Striped anchovy

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Forage Fish: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Forage species include Alewife, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Bay anchovy, Blueback herring, Butterfish, Capelin, Hickory shad, Northern sand lance, Round herring, and Striped anchovy

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Forage Fish: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Forage species include Alewife, American sand lance, American shad, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic menhaden, Bay anchovy, Blueback herring, Butterfish, Capelin, Hickory shad, Northern sand lance, Round herring, and Striped anchovy

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ASMFC FMPs: Biomass / Fish

These are species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan: Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American shad, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic herring, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Black sea bass, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Northern shrimp, Sand tiger, Scup, Smooth dogfish, Spiny dogfish, Spot, Striped bass, Summer flounder, Tautog, Weakfish, and Winter flounder

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ASMFC FMPs: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

These are species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan: Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American shad, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic herring, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Black sea bass, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Northern shrimp, Sand tiger, Scup, Smooth dogfish, Spiny dogfish, Spot, Striped bass, Summer flounder, Tautog, Weakfish, and Winter flounder

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ASMFC FMPs: Species Richness / Fish

These are species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Fisheries Management Plan: Alewife, American eel, American lobster, American shad, Atlantic croaker, Atlantic herring, Atlantic menhaden, Atlantic sharpnose shark, Atlantic sturgeon, Black sea bass, Blueback herring, Bluefish, Horseshoe crab, Jonah crab, Northern shrimp, Sand tiger, Scup, Smooth dogfish, Spiny dogfish, Spot, Striped bass, Summer flounder, Tautog, Weakfish, and Winter flounder

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MAFMC FMPs: Biomass / Fish

These are species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan: Summer flounder, Scup, Black sea bass, Spiny dogfish, Atlantic mackerel, Longfin squid, Northern shortfin squid, Butterfish, Bluefish, and Golden tilefish

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MAFMC FMPs: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

These are species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan: Summer flounder, Scup, Black sea bass, Spiny dogfish, Atlantic mackerel, Longfin squid, Northern shortfin squid, Butterfish, Bluefish, and Golden tilefish

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MAFMC FMPs: Species Richness / Fish

These are species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species under a Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Fisheries Management Plan: Summer flounder, Scup, Black sea bass, Spiny dogfish, Atlantic mackerel, Longfin squid, Northern shortfin squid, Butterfish, Bluefish, and Golden tilefish

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NEFMC Monkfish: Biomass / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Monkfish Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Monkfish are managed under a New England Fishery Management Council Fishery Management Plan

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NEFMC Monkfish: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Monkfish Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Monkfish are managed under a New England Fishery Management Council Fishery Management Plan

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NEFMC Monkfish: Species Richness / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Monkfish Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Monkfish are managed under a New England Fishery Management Council Fishery Management Plan

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NEFMC multispecies: Biomass / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Multi-species Fisheries Management Plan: Atlantic cod, Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic halibut, Haddock, Ocean pout, Pollock, Yellowtail flounder, Winter flounder, Witch flounder, Windowpane flounder and White hake and Wolffish

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NEFMC multispecies: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Multi-species Fisheries Management Plan: Atlantic cod, Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic halibut, Haddock, Ocean pout, Pollock, Yellowtail flounder, Winter flounder, Witch flounder, Windowpane flounder and White hake and Wolffish

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NEFMC multispecies: Species Richness / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Multi-species Fisheries Management Plan: Atlantic cod, Haddock, Pollock, Yellowtail flounder, Winter flounder, American plaice, Witch flounder, Windowpane flounder and White hake

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NEFMC Skates: Biomass / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan: Barndoor skate, Clearnose skate, Little skate, Rosette skate, Smooth skate, Thorny skate, and Winter skate

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NEFMC Skates: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan: Barndoor skate, Clearnose skate, Little skate, Rosette skate, Smooth skate, Thorny skate, and Winter skate

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NEFMC Skates: Species Richness / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Skates Fisheries Management Plan: Barndoor skate, Clearnose skate, Little skate, Rosette skate, Smooth skate, Thorny skate, and Winter skate

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NEFMC small mesh multispecies: Biomass / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council small mesh multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Small Mesh Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan: Silver hake, and Red hake

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NEFMC small mesh multispecies: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council small mesh multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Small Mesh Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan: Silver hake, and Red hake

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NEFMC small mesh multispecies: Species Richness / Fish

This is for the New England Fishery Management Council small mesh multispecies Fisheries Management Plan. For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

This includes the following species managed under the New England Fishery Management Council Small Mesh Multispecies Fisheries Management Plan: Silver hake, and Red hake

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EFH Species: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Modeled EFH species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Bluefish, Butterfish, Clearnose skate, Haddock, Little skate, Longfin squid, Monkfish, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea scallop, Shortfin squid, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Spiny dogfish, Summer flounder, Thorny skate, Tilefish, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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EFH Species: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Modeled EFH species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Bluefish, Butterfish, Clearnose skate, Haddock, Little skate, Longfin squid, Monkfish, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea scallop, Shortfin squid, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Spiny dogfish, Summer flounder, Thorny skate, Tilefish, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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EFH Species: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Modeled EFH species include Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, Atlantic halibut, Atlantic herring, Atlantic mackerel, Barndoor skate, Black sea bass, Bluefish, Butterfish, Clearnose skate, Haddock, Little skate, Longfin squid, Monkfish, Ocean pout, Pollock, Red hake, Rosette skate, Scup, Sea scallop, Shortfin squid, Silver hake, Smooth skate, Spiny dogfish, Summer flounder, Thorny skate, Tilefish, White hake, Windowpane flounder, Winter flounder, Winter skate, Witch flounder, Wolffish, and Yellowtail flounder

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Highly Migratory Species: Biomass / Fish

For all fish species together and for each group of species, total biomass maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total interpolated biomass of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell. Note that individual fish species IDW maps calculate biomass on a natural logarithm scale, and these aggregate maps are raw biomass.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Highly migratory species included here are Atlantic sharpnose shark and Sand tiger shark

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Highly Migratory Species: Core Biomass Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Fish

The purpose of a core biomass area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the interpolated biomass of each fish species. Summing all the cells in the IDW product gives the total interpolated biomass. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their biomass value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest biomass values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total interpolated biomass. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted biomass values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Highly migratory species included here are Atlantic sharpnose shark and Sand tiger shark

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Highly Migratory Species: Species Richness / Fish

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Highly migratory species included here are Atlantic sharpnose shark and Sand tiger shark

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Marine Mammals

Marine life data products were developed through a partnership with the Marine-life Data and Analysis Team (MDAT), who collaborated with the Northeast Regional Planning Body (RPB) and expert work groups to produce maps characterizing the predicted distribution and abundance for 29 marine mammal species and species guilds, 40 bird species, and the surveyed biomass of 82 fish species.

Based on RPB, work group, and public feedback, we further aggregated these base products into maps for various species groups within each marine life category to provide additional information to support different management and conservation activities. To facilitate targeted data exploration and decision making, we developed synthetic maps characterizing the abundance, richness, diversity, and core relative abundance area richness (50%) for these groups of species and for complete taxa. These synthetic map products are meant to supplement the individual species outputs.

All map products were informed by public input, work groups composed of over 80 regional scientists and managers, the Ecosystem Based Management Work Group, and similar proceedings in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Source: Marine Life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The synthetic map products provide a means to distill multiple data layers and time periods into simplified maps. Development of these maps required decisions and thresholds that are explained in the information accompanying each layer. These decisions were made after conducting research, development, and testing of several options, as well as incorporating feedback from expert work group members and the RPB. Understanding these decisions and thresholds is crucial to proper interpretation of these map products.

Species group definitions were developed by MDAT with guidance and input from the marine life expert work groups and RPB. There are three main caveats when considering use of the species groups: (1) The species within these groups represent only those modeled or mapped by MDAT. As an example, there may be additional “migrant” bird species not captured in this species group because there were insufficient observations available to develop an individual species model. (2) The groups are not exhaustive. There is potential for additional groups, but the data and information available at this time do not support their formation. In order to develop species membership lists for all groups, we relied on expert judgment and published sources of information. (3) Group level products (relative abundance, richness, and core relative abundance area richness) were created with the normalized annual prediction models, and so should be interpreted accordingly.

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All Cetaceans: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 34 cetacean species were modeled: Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Blue whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Bryde's whale, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, False killer whale, Fin whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Harbor porpoise, Humpback whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Pygmy sperm whale, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Sei whale, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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All Cetaceans: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 34 cetacean species were modeled: Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Blue whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Bryde's whale, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, False killer whale, Fin whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Harbor porpoise, Humpback whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Pygmy sperm whale, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Sei whale, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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All Cetaceans: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

The following 34 cetacean species were modeled: Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Blue whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Bryde's whale, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, False killer whale, Fin whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Harbor porpoise, Humpback whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Pygmy sperm whale, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Sei whale, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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Species of Concern: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of concern include Blue whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, North Atlantic right whale, Sei whale, and Sperm whale

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Species of Concern: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of concern include Blue whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, North Atlantic right whale, Sei whale, and Sperm whale

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Species of Concern: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species of concern include Blue whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, North Atlantic right whale, Sei whale, and Sperm whale

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Sound sensitivity High frequency: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with high-frequency sound sensitivity include Dwarf sperm whale, Harbor porpoise, and Pygmy sperm whale

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Sound sensitivity High frequency: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with high-frequency sound sensitivity include Dwarf sperm whale, Harbor porpoise, and Pygmy sperm whale

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Sound sensitivity High frequency: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with high-frequency sound sensitivity include Dwarf sperm whale, Harbor porpoise, and Pygmy sperm whale

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Sound sensitivity Low frequency: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with low-frequency sound sensitivity include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Sound sensitivity Low frequency: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with low-frequency sound sensitivity include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Sound sensitivity Low frequency: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with low-frequency sound sensitivity include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Sound sensitivity Medium frequency: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with medium-frequency sound sensitivity include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, False killer whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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Sound sensitivity Medium frequency: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with medium-frequency sound sensitivity include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, False killer whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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Sound sensitivity Medium frequency: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Species with medium-frequency sound sensitivity include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Cuvier's beaked whale, False killer whale, Fraser's dolphin, Gervais' beaked whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Risso's dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Short-finned pilot whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, True's beaked whale, and White-beaked dolphin

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Baleen whales: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Baleen whales include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Baleen whales: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Baleen whales include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Baleen whales: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Baleen whales include Blue whale, Bryde's whale, Fin whale, Humpback whale, Minke whale, North Atlantic right whale, and Sei whale

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Sperm and beaked whales: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Sperm and beaked whales include Blainville's beaked whale, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, Gervais' beaked whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pygmy sperm whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, and True's beaked whale

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Sperm and beaked whales: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Sperm and beaked whales include Blainville's beaked whale, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, Gervais' beaked whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pygmy sperm whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, and True's beaked whale

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Sperm and beaked whales: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Sperm and beaked whales include Blainville's beaked whale, Cuvier's beaked whale, Dwarf sperm whale, Gervais' beaked whale, Northern bottlenose whale, Pygmy sperm whale, Sowerby's beaked whale, Sperm whale, and True's beaked whale

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Small delphinoids: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Small delphinoids include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Fraser's dolphin, Harbor porpoise, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, and White-beaked dolphin

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Small delphinoids: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Small delphinoids include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Fraser's dolphin, Harbor porpoise, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, and White-beaked dolphin

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Small delphinoids: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Small delphinoids include Atlantic spotted dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, Bottlenose dolphin, Clymene dolphin, Fraser's dolphin, Harbor porpoise, Pantropical spotted dolphin, Rough-toothed dolphin, Short-beaked common dolphin, Spinner dolphin, Striped dolphin, and White-beaked dolphin

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Large delphinoids: Abundance / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, total abundance maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted annual abundance layers and summing the values of the pixels in each resulting “column”. The result is the total predicted abundance of all individuals (of the included species) in that cell.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Large delphinoids include False killer whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Risso's dolphin, and Short-finned pilot whale

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Large delphinoids: Core Abundance Area - Mid-Atlantic scale / Marine Mammals

The purpose of a core abundance area map is to represent the smallest area containing 50% of the predicted abundance of each species. Summing all the cells (pixels) in the species' normalized annual relative abundance distribution product gives the total predicted relative abundance. Core area is calculated by ranking cells by their relative abundance value from greatest to least, then summing cells with the highest abundance values until the total is equal to or greater than 50% of the total predicted relative abundance. For the Mid-Atlantic scale product, only the predicted relative abundance values within the Mid-Atlantic are used in the ranking.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Large delphinoids include False killer whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Risso's dolphin, and Short-finned pilot whale

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Large delphinoids: Species Richness / Marine Mammals

For all species together and for each group of species, species richness maps are calculated in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by stacking each individual species’ predicted presence or absence and counting the total number of species present in each cell. Some mammal species were modeled as a group to create the most robust outputs (e.g., beaked whales, pilot whales). To most accurately calculate species richness, the species within these groups were re-modeled individually and counted as individual species.

Source: Marine-life Data and Analysis Team

Notes:

Large delphinoids include False killer whale, Killer whale, Long-finned pilot whale, Melon-headed whale, Risso's dolphin, and Short-finned pilot whale

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Sea Scallops Average Abundance (SMAST)

This layer shows the average abundance (2003 - 2012) of Sea scallops, colored by percentile. Abundance of 1 or more represents an area with commercially viable scallop densities. This data product was created using the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) video survey from 2003 through 2012 joined to the New England Fishery Management Council Swept Area Seabed Impact (SASI) model grid. The SMAST video survey covered the Continental Shelf from the southern Mid-Atlantic to the USA-Canadian border on eastern Georges Bank.

Source: Northeast Ocean Data

Notes:

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Sea Scallops Biomass, meat weight in kg (NEFSC) - Draft

This layer displays scallop biomass (meat weights in kilograms) from all NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center NEFSC scallop dredge surveys from 1966 to 2014. The NEFSC scallop survey program began in 1960 and had a major gear change in 1979. Since 1979 there have been other gear and vessel changes, for which the effects are generally small. In cases where it was deemed appropriate after study, correction factors have been applied to the data. These data are used to help assess the stock of scallops in the Northeast and Mid Atlantic. Other data that are collected during NEFSC scallop dredge surveys (but that are not shown here) include scallop shell heights, the number and height of dead scallop shells, any finfish, cephalopods and lobsters caught during the survey, as well as the presence/absence of other bivalve species (e.g., ocean quahogs, razor clams) and invertebrate species (e.g., sand dollars, anemones).

Source: Northeast Ocean Data

Notes:

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Estuarine Wetlands

These are estuarine wetlands taken from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory data. This layer is included primarily to show the extent of tidal salt marsh in the Mid-Atlantic, however estuarine scrub-shrub and estuarine forested wetlands are also included. The source date of these data varies from 1977 to 2013, however 99% of the data are from 2000 or later and 83% of the data are from 2007 or later. Clicking an area on the map will show the source date for that area.

Source: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Notes:

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Benthic Habitats (North)

Benthic habitats are based on Ecological Marine Units (EMUs), which represent the three-way combination of depth, sediment grain size and seabed forms based on the ecological thresholds revealed by the organism relationships. Benthic habitats are combinations of EMUs considered with their species assemblages. Thresholds were created by classifying grab samples into organism groups based on similarities in the composition and abundance of the benthic species using hierarchical cluster analysis. To perform this analysis, each grab sample was classified to an organism group, then overlaid on standardized base maps of depth, sediment grain size and seabed forms, and attributed with the information taken from the classified data. Regression trees were built individually for each physical variable to identify critical thresholds that separated sets of organism groups from each other. Regression trees were also built using all variables collectively to identify which variables were driving the organism differences. Each analysis was performed separately by ecological subregion after data exploration revealed that the relationships between genera and physical factors differed markedly among subregions.

Source: USGS, NOAA; analysis by TNC

Notes:

This data product was created as part of the Northwest Atlantic Marine Ecoregional Assessment. The Nature Conservancy developed this science-based ecoregional assessment for the Northwest Atlantic Marine region (Bay of Fundy to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina). This assessment synthesizes information on oceanography, chemistry, geology, biology, and social science to inform decisions about coastal and marine ecosystems. The ten categories of targets identified as the primary structure for the marine ecoregional assessment are: coastal and estuarine habitats, benthic habitats, diadromous fish, demersal fish, pelagic fish, forage fish, nearshore shellfish, shorebirds and seabirds, marine mammals, and sea turtles.

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Benthic Habitats (South)

Benthic habitats are based on Ecological Marine Units (EMUs), which represent the three-way combination of depth, sediment grain size and seabed forms based on the ecological thresholds revealed by the organism relationships. Benthic habitats are combinations of EMUs considered with their species assemblages. Thresholds were created by classifying grab samples into organism groups based on similarities in the composition and abundance of the benthic species using hierarchical cluster analysis. To perform this analysis, each grab sample was classified to an organism group, then overlaid on standardized base maps of depth, sediment grain size and seabed forms, and attributed with the information taken from the classified data. Regression trees were built individually for each physical variable to identify critical thresholds that separated sets of organism groups from each other. Regression trees were also built using all variables collectively to identify which variables were driving the organism differences. Each analysis was performed separately by ecological subregion after data exploration revealed that the relationships between genera and physical factors differed markedly among subregions.

Source: USGS, NOAA; analysis by TNC

Notes:

This data product was created as part of the Northwest Atlantic Marine Ecoregional Assessment. The Nature Conservancy developed this science-based ecoregional assessment for the Northwest Atlantic Marine region (Bay of Fundy to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina). This assessment synthesizes information on oceanography, chemistry, geology, biology, and social science to inform decisions about coastal and marine ecosystems. The ten categories of targets identified as the primary structure for the marine ecoregional assessment are: coastal and estuarine habitats, benthic habitats, diadromous fish, demersal fish, pelagic fish, forage fish, nearshore shellfish, shorebirds and seabirds, marine mammals, and sea turtles.

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EFH Highly Migratory Species

This dataset is an aggregation of numerous Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) spatial data products for Highly Migratory Species (HMS), which are fish such as tuna, sharks, and swordfish that live and migrate throughout the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) manages HMS under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, which requires the identification of EFH in fishery management plans. This includes impacts from fishing and non-fishing activities on EFH, and the identification of actions required to conserve and enhance EFH, which is defined as those waters and substrate necessary to fish for spawning, breeding, feeding, or growth to maturity.

Source: National Marine Fisheries Service; Northeast Regional Ocean Council

Notes:

The source data for this product included 42 available Highly Migratory Species EFH datasets from NMFS as of the publication date. The dataset contains a field for each species indicating whether EFH is present within each feature record. An additional field was added to count the total number of overlapping species within each area.

Species represented in this product are:

Albacore Tuna, Angel Shark, Atlantic Sharpnose Shark, Basking Shark, Bigeye Thresher Shark, Bigeye Tuna, Bignose Shark, Blacknose Shark, Blacktip Shark, Bluefin Tuna, Blue Marlin, Blue Shark, Bonnethead Shark, Bull Shark, Caribbean Reef Shark, Common Thresher Shark, Dusky Shark, Finetooth Shark, Great Hammerhead Shark, Lemon Shark, Longbill Spearfish, Longfin Mako Shark, Night Shark, Nurse Shark, Oceanic Whitetip Shark, Porbeagle Roundscale Spearfish, Shark, Sailfish, Sandbar Shark, Sand Tiger Shark, Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Shortfin Mako Shark, Silky Shark, Skipjack Tuna, Smooth Dogfish, Spinner Shark, Swordfish, Tiger Shark, Whale Shark, White Marlin, White Shark, and Yellowfin Tuna.

Source datasets contained multiple records denoting EFH for one or more life stages including adult, juvenile, larvae, or egg. These separate life stages were merged together in ArcGIS to create a single feature that represented all life stage EFH for each species. Therefore this layer does not show EFH life stage information. Rather it provides information on where any EFH life stage occurs for a given species and it shows the number of species that have overlapping EFH in any given location. Due to the geometry and high number of source datasets, feature boundaries may appear irregular and there are numerous features with minute geometries which occur at the boundaries of source EFH datasets. This is a multipart dataset.

After data processing and aggregation was complete, the product was reviewed by NMFS personnel to provide feedback on content and representation.

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Essential Fish Habitats

This layer represents an overlay of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) polygons for all 39 species under Federal management in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. It was developed for general visualization and informational purposes only and does not necessarily represent the most important habitats.

EFH is defined as those waters and substrate necessary to fish for spawning, breeding, feeding, or growth to maturity (16 U.S.C. 1802(10)). Waters include aquatic areas and their associated physical, chemical, and biological properties that are used by fish and may include aquatic areas historically used by fish where appropriate; substrate includes sediment, hard bottom, structures underlying the waters, and associated biological communities; necessary means the habitat required to support a sustainable fishery and the managed species' contribution to a healthy ecosystem; and spawning, breeding, feeding, or growth to maturity covers a species' full life cycle. See the NOAA Essential Fish Habitat Mapper for more information and for maps of individual species.

Source: NOAA; analysis by TNC

Notes:

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Habitat for Soft Corals (Modeled)

This dataset depicts the predicted likelihood of suitable habitat for deep-sea corals in the order Alcyonacea in the U.S. Northeast Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic as coral habitat suitability likelihood classes derived from a categorical reclassification of the logistic output of a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) model derived from coral presence locations and environmental predictor variables at 370.65m resolution.

Source: NOAA/NOS National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)

Notes:

Deep-sea coral is a diverse and valuable resource that, among many things, provides habitat for fish and invertebrates. Because of their slow growth rates and vulnerability to bottom disturbance, deep-sea coral ecosystems are particularly important to conserve. Mapping the exact distribution of deep-sea coral is challenging because because of the logistical difficulty and expense of surveying the deep ocean. Predictive modeling of deep-sea coral habitats is essential for supporting conservation planning and for targeting areas for future mapping and exploration. Modeling can also lead to insights into the environmental factors driving the distribution of deep-sea corals, helping to build our knowledge base of how these unique ecosystems function.

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Sea Turtles

Areas where sightings of loggerhead, leatherback, or green sea turtles are common.

Source: NOAA; analysis by TNC

Notes:

Areas where sightings per unit effort for loggerhead, leatherback and green sea turtles were two or more standard deviations higher than the regional average. For these species, 'regional' includes the Mid-Atlantic, Southern New England and the Gulf of Maine.

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Deep Sea Corals (Observed)

These are deep sea coral observation points extracted from a national database published by NOAA's Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSC-RTP). The database is tailored to occurrence records of all the azooxanthellate corals, a subset of all corals, and all sponge species. Records shallower than 50 m are generally excluded in order to focus on predominantly deep-water species.

Source: NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program

Notes:

Observations record only where surveys have been conducted. Absence of an observation should not be interpreted as absence of corals.

Seagrasses

This map displays locations of patchy and continuous seagrasses on the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Pacific coasts of the United States. This includes aquatic vascular vegetation beds dominated by submerged, rooted, vascular species or submerged or rooted floating freshwater tidal vascular vegetation.

Source: NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Notes:

This is NOT a complete collection of seagrasses on the seafloor, nor are the locations to be considered exact. The presence and location of the seagrasses have been derived from multiple state and federal sources. These data are intended for coastal and ocean planning. Not for navigation.

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