21

Recreation

The Mid-Atlantic boasts countless opportunities for entertainment and leisure activities and has flourishing travel, tourism, and outdoor recreation industries, many of which are focused on the region’s natural features.

Coastal Recreation Survey

The primary goal of the Coastal Recreation Survey was to fill an important data gap and inform regional ocean planning efforts in the Mid-Atlantic by providing a spatial baseline of non-consumptive coastal and ocean recreation use patterns in the region.

The data were collected through an online survey where respondents placed a marker to indicate where they recreated on the coast for certain activities in the last 12 months. The data is displayed using a 1 kilometer by 1 kilometer grid and each cell indicates the number of activity points that fell within each cell.

Mapped activities were grouped together into the follow activity groupings:

Shore-based: Beach going, biking/hiking, camping, and collection of non-living resources/beachcombing.

Surface Water: Kayaking/paddling, swimming, windsurfing, kite boarding, skim boarding, and surfing

Underwater Activities: SCUBA diving from a charter boat, SCUBA diving from shore or a boat, and free diving/snorkeling

Wildlife and Sightseeing Activities: sitting in your car watching the scene, scenic enjoyment, photography, and wildlife viewing

Source: The Surfrider Foundation, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy, and Monmouth University

Notes:

Shore-based Activities / Coastal Recreation Survey

Shore-based activities include the following: Beach going, biking/hiking, camping, and collection of non-living resources/beachcombing.

See the Coastal Recreation Survey description for more information.

Source: The Surfrider Foundation, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy, and Monmouth University

Notes:

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Surface Water Activities / Coastal Recreation Survey

Surface water activities include the following: Kayaking/paddling, swimming, windsurfing, kite boarding, skim boarding, and surfing.

See the Coastal Recreation Survey description for more information.

Source: The Surfrider Foundation, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy, and Monmouth University

Notes:

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Underwater Activities / Coastal Recreation Survey

Underwater activities include the following: SCUBA diving from a charter boat, SCUBA diving from shore or a boat, and free diving/snorkeling.

See the Coastal Recreation Survey description for more information.

Source: The Surfrider Foundation, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy, and Monmouth University

Notes:

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Wildlife and Sightseeing Activities / Coastal Recreation Survey

Wildlife and sightseeing activities include the following: sitting in your car watching the scene, scenic enjoyment, photography, and wildlife viewing.

See the Coastal Recreation Survey description for more information.

Source: The Surfrider Foundation, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy, and Monmouth University

Notes:

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Recreational Boating Survey

The goal of this study was to gather data on recreational boating routes and activities in ocean and coastal waters of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region—covering the states of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. The data were collected each month through an online survey deployed to registered boaters from June 4, 2013 to December 1, 2013. The survey respondents provided spatial information by drawing their boating routes and placing a marker to indicate where they recreated in the last month. The resulting data layers display the density of boater routes and activity points in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Please note this data set should not be construed as representative of private boater activity as a whole. Due to the limited number of survey respondents, the data represents only a portion of actual offshore private boating activities.

Source: Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy

Notes:

Recreational Boating points / Recreational Boating Survey

Recreational boating activity points. See Recreational Boating Survey description for more information.

Source: Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy

Notes:

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Recreational Boating density (1km) / Recreational Boating Survey

Density grid of activity points at 1 km resolution. See Recreational Boating Survey description for more information.

Source: Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy

Notes:

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Recreational Boating density (5km) / Recreational Boating Survey

Density grid of activity points at 5 km resolution. See Recreational Boating Survey description for more information.

Source: Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy

Notes:

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Recreational Boating routes and density / Recreational Boating Survey

Recreational boating routes and route density. See Recreational Boating Survey description for more information.

Source: Monmouth University Urban Coast Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston, Point 97, The Nature Conservancy

Notes:

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Northeast Recreational Boating Density / Recreational Boating Survey

The Recreational Boating Density layer depicts a data product from the 2012 Northeast Recreational Boater Survey, conducted by SeaPlan and the Northeast Regional Ocean Council (NROC). Both a random and a supplemental sample of Northeast boaters plotted their boating routes throughout the 2012 boating season using an online mapping application. The density map is derived using only the random sample of survey participants and is intended to show the relative density of boating activity throughout the region using a scale from high (red) to low (green). Areas showing low or no activity does not necessarily mean they are not used for recreational purposes. According to the results of the survey, these areas are likely less trafficked than others.

Source: Northeast Ocean Data

Notes:

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Recreational Uses Workshop: DE

This is an overview of the Delaware recreational use survey. For further details see individual state data portals. In each state, over 20 recreational uses were mapped - both general use footprints (areas in which a use is known to occur with some regularity, regardless of its frequency or intensity) and dominant use areas (areas routinely used by most users most of the time). A sum of the dominant use areas is presented here as a "number of activities", however users can click on the map to reveal dominant use areas and footprints for all uses at a particular location.

Members of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey, collected information on how the public uses their coastal and ocean spaces through participatory GIS workshops in 2012. These baseline data were collected to inform planning efforts being undertaken by various agencies. Collecting data on the variety of ways the public uses the Seaside Bays and Atlantic Ocean will help to plan for reducing use conflicts in our coastal waters, maximizing efficiency, and enhancing environmental and economic productivity. State and federally managed waters of the Mid-Atlantic and the U.S. are used in many ways: commercial fishing, aquaculture, shipping, military exercises, sand mining, habitat for wildlife, and recreation. With new and expanding coastal and ocean uses emerging such as energy production and increased shipping, the pressure is mounting to ensure that there is space for both traditional and new uses and that conflicts are minimized. Some mapped human use data existed, but prior to this project, the Mid-Atlantic states had no recreational water use data. This data was collected using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Participatory Mapping Method.

Source: Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control

Notes:

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Recreational Uses Workshop: MD

This is an overview of the Maryland recreational use survey. For further details see individual state data portals. In each state, over 20 recreational uses were mapped - both general use footprints (areas in which a use is known to occur with some regularity, regardless of its frequency or intensity) and dominant use areas (areas routinely used by most users most of the time). A sum of the dominant use areas is presented here as a "number of activities", however users can click on the map to reveal dominant use areas and footprints for all uses at a particular location.

Members of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey, collected information on how the public uses their coastal and ocean spaces through participatory GIS workshops in 2012. These baseline data were collected to inform planning efforts being undertaken by various agencies. Collecting data on the variety of ways the public uses the Seaside Bays and Atlantic Ocean will help to plan for reducing use conflicts in our coastal waters, maximizing efficiency, and enhancing environmental and economic productivity. State and federally managed waters of the Mid-Atlantic and the U.S. are used in many ways: commercial fishing, aquaculture, shipping, military exercises, sand mining, habitat for wildlife, and recreation. With new and expanding coastal and ocean uses emerging such as energy production and increased shipping, the pressure is mounting to ensure that there is space for both traditional and new uses and that conflicts are minimized. Some mapped human use data existed, but prior to this project, the Mid-Atlantic states had no recreational water use data. This data was collected using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Participatory Mapping Method.

Source: Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Notes:

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Recreational Uses Workshop: NJ

The New Jersey recreational use survey data is presented here together with an earlier layer of sportfishing grounds because the recreational use survey did not adequately capture recreational fishing areas.

Source: New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Notes:

NJDEP Sport Ocean Fishing Grounds / Recreational Uses Workshop: NJ

Prime fishing areas have a demonstrable history of supporting a significant local quantity of recreational and commercial fishing activity. The Department first mapped prime fishing areas in the 1980s. Since the map is over 20 years old, it was determined in 2003 that an update was needed. Charter boat, party boat and private boat captains were surveyed to identify the areas they consider recreationally significant fishing areas or prime fishing areas. This information was then compiled and refined into a digital format.

Source: New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Notes:

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NJ Recreational Uses Workshop / Recreational Uses Workshop: NJ

This is an overview of the New Jersey recreational use survey. For further details see individual state data portals. In each state, over 20 recreational uses were mapped - both general use footprints (areas in which a use is known to occur with some regularity, regardless of its frequency or intensity) and dominant use areas (areas routinely used by most users most of the time). A sum of the dominant use areas is presented here as a "number of activities", however users can click on the map to reveal dominant use areas and footprints for all uses at a particular location.

Members of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey, collected information on how the public uses their coastal and ocean spaces through participatory GIS workshops in 2012. These baseline data were collected to inform planning efforts being undertaken by various agencies. Collecting data on the variety of ways the public uses the Seaside Bays and Atlantic Ocean will help to plan for reducing use conflicts in our coastal waters, maximizing efficiency, and enhancing environmental and economic productivity. State and federally managed waters of the Mid-Atlantic and the U.S. are used in many ways: commercial fishing, aquaculture, shipping, military exercises, sand mining, habitat for wildlife, and recreation. With new and expanding coastal and ocean uses emerging such as energy production and increased shipping, the pressure is mounting to ensure that there is space for both traditional and new uses and that conflicts are minimized. Some mapped human use data existed, but prior to this project, the Mid-Atlantic states had no recreational water use data. This data was collected using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Participatory Mapping Method.

Source: New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

Notes:

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Recreational Uses Workshop: NY

DOS staff worked with NOAA’s Coastal Services Center (CSC) to design and develop a participatory mapping process. Leaders from 30 partner organizations and other knowledgeable individuals were invited to participate in one of five offshore use workshops conducted during the summer of 2011: two each in Riverhead and Baldwin, and one in Manhattan.At the workshops, DOS and CSC trained organizational contacts and knowledgeable individuals to work with their colleagues, constituents, and memberships to collect ocean use information. At the conclusion of the workshops, participants were provided with information-collecting kits containing navigation charts, information tables, guidance for meeting with their members and collecting information, sample charts and tables, and copies of several one-pagers explaining DOS’s marine spatial planning process, ocean uses, offshore habitats, and offshore renewable energy development.Workshop participants collected ocean use information from their peers over several months, and the marked-up charts with corresponding information tables were returned to DOS, representing over 130 records of new ocean use information. DOS digitized the geographic information provided by ocean users and created an aggregate dataset, including linked attribute data characterizing each mapped use area. DOS staff returned to the organizations that provided ocean use information to “ground truth” the digitized data during the winter of 2011 and through the spring of 2012. These geographic data were updated/corrected based on participant feedback.

Source: New York Department of State

Notes:

NY Recreational Fishing / Recreational Uses Workshop: NY

DOS staff worked with NOAA’s Coastal Services Center (CSC) to design and develop a participatory mapping process. Leaders from 30 partner organizations and other knowledgeable individuals were invited to participate in one of five offshore use workshops conducted during the summer of 2011: two each in Riverhead and Baldwin, and one in Manhattan.At the workshops, DOS and CSC trained organizational contacts and knowledgeable individuals to work with their colleagues, constituents, and memberships to collect ocean use information. At the conclusion of the workshops, participants were provided with information-collecting kits containing navigation charts, information tables, guidance for meeting with their members and collecting information, sample charts and tables, and copies of several one-pagers explaining DOS’s marine spatial planning process, ocean uses, offshore habitats, and offshore renewable energy development.Workshop participants collected ocean use information from their peers over several months, and the marked-up charts with corresponding information tables were returned to DOS, representing over 130 records of new ocean use information. DOS digitized the geographic information provided by ocean users and created an aggregate dataset, including linked attribute data characterizing each mapped use area. DOS staff returned to the organizations that provided ocean use information to “ground truth” the digitized data during the winter of 2011 and through the spring of 2012. These geographic data were updated/corrected based on participant feedback.

Source: New York Department of State

Notes:

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NY Surfing / Recreational Uses Workshop: NY

DOS staff worked with NOAA’s Coastal Services Center (CSC) to design and develop a participatory mapping process. Leaders from 30 partner organizations and other knowledgeable individuals were invited to participate in one of five offshore use workshops conducted during the summer of 2011: two each in Riverhead and Baldwin, and one in Manhattan.At the workshops, DOS and CSC trained organizational contacts and knowledgeable individuals to work with their colleagues, constituents, and memberships to collect ocean use information. At the conclusion of the workshops, participants were provided with information-collecting kits containing navigation charts, information tables, guidance for meeting with their members and collecting information, sample charts and tables, and copies of several one-pagers explaining DOS’s marine spatial planning process, ocean uses, offshore habitats, and offshore renewable energy development.Workshop participants collected ocean use information from their peers over several months, and the marked-up charts with corresponding information tables were returned to DOS, representing over 130 records of new ocean use information. DOS digitized the geographic information provided by ocean users and created an aggregate dataset, including linked attribute data characterizing each mapped use area. DOS staff returned to the organizations that provided ocean use information to “ground truth” the digitized data during the winter of 2011 and through the spring of 2012. These geographic data were updated/corrected based on participant feedback.

Source: New York Department of State

Notes:

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NY Wildlife Viewing / Recreational Uses Workshop: NY

DOS staff worked with NOAA’s Coastal Services Center (CSC) to design and develop a participatory mapping process. Leaders from 30 partner organizations and other knowledgeable individuals were invited to participate in one of five offshore use workshops conducted during the summer of 2011: two each in Riverhead and Baldwin, and one in Manhattan.At the workshops, DOS and CSC trained organizational contacts and knowledgeable individuals to work with their colleagues, constituents, and memberships to collect ocean use information. At the conclusion of the workshops, participants were provided with information-collecting kits containing navigation charts, information tables, guidance for meeting with their members and collecting information, sample charts and tables, and copies of several one-pagers explaining DOS’s marine spatial planning process, ocean uses, offshore habitats, and offshore renewable energy development.Workshop participants collected ocean use information from their peers over several months, and the marked-up charts with corresponding information tables were returned to DOS, representing over 130 records of new ocean use information. DOS digitized the geographic information provided by ocean users and created an aggregate dataset, including linked attribute data characterizing each mapped use area. DOS staff returned to the organizations that provided ocean use information to “ground truth” the digitized data during the winter of 2011 and through the spring of 2012. These geographic data were updated/corrected based on participant feedback.

Source: New York Department of State

Notes:

View related studies via ESPIS

Recreational Uses Workshop: VA

This is an overview of the Virginia recreational use survey. For further details see individual state data portals. In each state, over 20 recreational uses were mapped - both general use footprints (areas in which a use is known to occur with some regularity, regardless of its frequency or intensity) and dominant use areas (areas routinely used by most users most of the time). A sum of the dominant use areas is presented here as a "number of activities", however users can click on the map to reveal dominant use areas and footprints for all uses at a particular location.

Members of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey, collected information on how the public uses their coastal and ocean spaces through participatory GIS workshops in 2012. These baseline data were collected to inform planning efforts being undertaken by various agencies. Collecting data on the variety of ways the public uses the Seaside Bays and Atlantic Ocean will help to plan for reducing use conflicts in our coastal waters, maximizing efficiency, and enhancing environmental and economic productivity. State and federally managed waters of the Mid-Atlantic and the U.S. are used in many ways: commercial fishing, aquaculture, shipping, military exercises, sand mining, habitat for wildlife, and recreation. With new and expanding coastal and ocean uses emerging such as energy production and increased shipping, the pressure is mounting to ensure that there is space for both traditional and new uses and that conflicts are minimized. Some mapped human use data existed, but prior to this project, the Mid-Atlantic states had no recreational water use data. This data was collected using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Protected Areas (MPA) Center Participatory Mapping Method.

Source: Virginia Coastal Zone Management Program

Notes:

View related studies via ESPIS